Every Problem Has a Solution

Club Creative Studio Solutions

In design, every problem has a solution, if you know what to look for and what to do to solve a design challenge.

PROBLEM & SOLUTION:

Remember this hand-made necklace I called: Yippee, Skippy, Spiffy, Hippy  from yesterday’s Facebook post?

Yippee, Skippy, Spiffy, Hippy
Yippee, Skippy, Spiffy, Hippy

As I modeled it, I noticed that the ceramic pedant often twisted to its back side. I don’t know if that would bother you BUT IT DID BOTHER ME, especially since it was not intended to be reversible.

You might like flip-flops but not when the word is used to describe your twisted pendant..
You might like flip-flops but not when the word is used to describe your twisted pendant..

I would like to share the solution to this problem. If you ever have a necklace that does this, examine two points carefully to identify a particular problem. I am always happy to make the needed adjustments for you if this is a concern with any necklace you wear.

Two points to ponder.
Two points to ponder.

As in this photo of the necklace: Examine to see if the dangle pendant has a correct balance.  Is it supported by a strong or a wide enough jump ring (metal loop as in figure 1.)

It may need a double loop attached for weight distribution of a heavier pendant.

The length of the necklace and where it “hits” you against your neck, or chest may also be a factor. In that case an extender chain can always be added if a short necklace is a cause for twisting.

Consider too, (as in figure 2.)  the connecting point. It may be in need of being wider or doubled to prevent the “pendulum” movement from front to back. For me, this is a simple adjustment, I am always happy to make a necklace more appealing for a purchaser.

This is a common problem but, it doesn’t have to be a problem for long. It is one reason why I like to try on and test a creation myself to avoid any aesthetic concerns in the first place.

Don’t give up on any problems you have with jewelry choices or comfortable wear, there is hopefully a solution to every problem. Does this help you as a “good to know” or helpful tip? Please let me know.

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That’s How They Roll: 8 Ideas to Stop Moving Beads

Club Creative Studio Solutions

I have a beading pet peeve: I dislike rolling beads falling from my design table to the floor.

Beads and other small craft items may roll and move away from you when you are attempting to handle them. This is an annoying fact; beads roll, beads drop. Here are eight ideas to stop beads from moving. Perhaps one solution listed will work nicely for your needs.

Rolling Bead Solutions

1.  Use a  “sticky mat”  A sticky mat is a gel-like, somewhat “sticky” surface that clings to beads readily. This surface type is also sold to hold cell phones in place when placed on a car dashboard. I personally have not used such a mat but, I assume that they would work for stopping the roll of beads. Gathering dust on the surface would be my main concern for loss of traction.

2.  Use a design board A design board has a few designated compartment sections for beads however, it generally does not have a lip around it to stop beads from falling off the base into the table or floor.  They are relatively inexpensive however, and come in a variety of sizes.

3.  Use a felt mat  I often use a square piece of felt at the base of my work area. I place it closest to me, and up against my design board.  For the most part it works…until a bead bounces off of that area. Sometimes too, when I retrieve a bead, I gather fibers as well.

Any tray with a lip or raised edges may help stop beads from rolling.
Any tray with a lip or raised edges may help stop beads from rolling.

4.  Use a box lid, or cookie sheet  Anything under your hands or main work surface will act as a “catch-all” container. The key to working within a restricted area is habit. You will catch falling beads as long as you work in the realms of your containment areas.  This suggestion is really low-cost, if you recycle.

5.  Use a bead tray  My bead tray has a flat surface with a lip, and one corner has a hole with a stopper lid. Small beads can be dumped out from the designated end and back into a container or package. It serves well to stop rolling beads but, it is best used for seed beads. Larger beads get stuck, this tray is also quite small to work over.

6.  Use a drop cloth  This is probably my next technique to try. I read that using Velcro strips and an apron, you can create a “drop zone” easily.  Attach sewn Velcro strips to an apron end, and one strip to the underside of your work table.  Wear the apron and connect the Velcro ends to the table and use the apron material to catch the falling beads.  I guess I better sew myself an apron!

7.  Use a low pile carpet square  Place a low pile carpet square sample under your table or chair.  Often times I vacuum up stray beads from my carpet area. Clearing up a few beads at a time from carpet below can add up quickly. If you use a Dust Buster or small canister portable vacuum, you can more readily empty out the contents of beads collected from a small area of carpet after each bead session.  Provided there is no dirt, it serves a quick bead clean-up.

A tape lint brush can collect rolling beads.
A tape lint brush can collect rolling beads.

8.  Use sticky tape lint brush A sticky tape rolling lint brush may work for collecting  your small lightweight beads or buttons on your work surface. Try tapping it against rolling beads and stop them in their tracks.  It also works well to collect threads and picking up needles from a slick surface.

Let me know if you have tried or are using any of these suggested methods to solve your bead rolling problems.  If you have additional suggestions to aid in this common problem crafters and artists face, please share your comments with us. Club Creative Studio appreciates your feedback. I hope that I have helped you solve a problem by Sharing a Creative Solution.

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