J is for: Jewelry

J is for jewelry.  Many appreciate hand-made jewelry…and for good reasons.

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When I decided to design my own jewelry art items and make my own hand-made beads to incorporate in jewelry and other items, I knew it was going to be an expressive time for me.  It has become a welcomed challenge to be creative everyday.  I knew I was going to be able to help people become more bold in their personal styles, and I knew I had the time and talent to share art and share my creative journey efforts with others.

Growing up with creative ideas and armed with an Art Education background, I already had the stepping stones laid out for me to follow a creative path.  I have looked forward ever since then to ways that I could help others overcome ordinary and appreciate being individual and one-of-a-kind, just as my jewelry line and other hand-made beaded items offer.

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One of the coolest aspects of making exclusive pieces of art is knowing that the process can not and will not be duplicated. I have happily discovered that there are limitless ways that I can create and although a technique may be used in the same manner, the experience, materials and product outcome are always different. This allows me to continuously offer one-of-a-kind jewelry items. I am so proud of that.  Jewelry makes women, men and gift-givers feel good. Holding on to good moments and memories are what makes life more full.

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My exception to creating items with a similar outcome are for wedding party requests or specific custom orders for matching sets. When this is possible, I oblige.  Sometimes jewelry art calls for commonality as in those special cases.

The most rewarding art creations however, come from the times that I am able to experiment and create “free-form” art. Without any pre-conceived notions, expectations, sketches or even particular materials in hand- those are the challenges that face me with the most satisfaction. These are the times that jewelry works with me and for me.

To view more creations, remember that Club Creative Studio can be found on many different media platforms such as our Newsletter (see sidebar click-in option), Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, and Tumblar. Are you following the creativity?

 

 

 

 

 

 

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A Call For Custom Art

Club Creative Studio creates Custom Art.  I recently attended a meeting consisting of business persons. At one point, I spoke about the fact that I create custom art. A conversation ensued. A “Call for Custom” to me is a conversation that is welcomed. I used the chance to elaborate on the meaning of custom art.

I welcome the challenges that come to call when I am asked to create a custom art order.  Any person who shops for custom jewelry or other items are searching for that “perfect piece” not for what is going to serve them as “good enough” and is readily available on store shelves in front of them at the time.

Hand-made initial tie tack from Club Creative Studio
Hand-made initial tie tack from Club Creative Studio

I have two ways to describe custom jewelry:

1. Custom jewelry is a wonderful choice for people with unique and distinct tastes in styles.

2. Custom jewelry is a wonderful choice for people who wish to stand out in a crowd among many.

Club Creative Studio creation: Sea glass shard custom wrapped for pendant.
Club Creative Studio creation: Sea glass shard custom wrapped for pendant.

The Up-Side to Custom- When I create custom art, I design to fit the recipient’s particular needs. In these instances, the buyer has more control over the piece aesthetics. This allows for a heightened degree of attention to detail to hit those marks of service on my part. I listen carefully and take great notes. I strive to convey and incorporate special meaning into the art which makes it truly and extraordinarily unique to the individuals involved. A custom piece of art has to “speak” and have personal meaning upon the completion.

Club Creative Studio necklace features Kanji character.
Club Creative Studio necklace features Kanji character.

Custom work allows me to work closely with the purchaser to control color, materials, size and design elements of the art piece.  Sometimes there is a price point to consider, sometimes there are other limitations on the specifics.  Most times, I am happily trusted to “work my magic” with general ideas and added I am granted free rein for a finished product.

Most persons commonly think of “custom” in jewelry making when they have an opportunity to place loose stones or diamonds into a jewelry setting.  While this is popular thinking, there can be much more to this.

Use of significant colors and charms can make your jewelry personalized and more of a custom made piece.
Use of significant colors and charms can make your jewelry personalized and more of a custom made piece.

There are a few ways to place a custom description into your jewelry art.  Using a monogram, a personal image, specific theme charms or personalized engraved pendant, an initial charm, birthstones or birth crystal colors, and having a say in the over-all design to name a few.

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Some jewelry shoppers may be on the hunt for a personalized piece that has special meaning.  Others may want a wearable piece of art that no one else can own. BOTH are ways by which I support creating CUSTOM art. This is where Club Creative Studio comes in to save the day.

Our art is always custom, and created to be ONE-OF-A-KIND.

The Down-side to Custom While it is true that the buying process is longer than purchasing regular jewelry of the shelf of a large department store chain, the results are worth the wait.

Club Creative Studio welcomes your custom requests and looks forward to meeting your specific style needs. Together we can design another master piece!

Please view custom, one-of-a-kind art on the home page. When I design jewelry or home décor items, one of the main goals I have is to CREATE ART THAT SETS YOU APART. Allow me to create for you or that special someone. I love creating every day!

 

 

 

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Save-a-Cent Tuesday: Paint Palette Tips

I have decided to change the name of Club Creative Studio’s Two-Cent Tuesday post title to “SAVE- A-CENT TUESDAY” Often times a project or idea featured on Tuesday will save you more than a few cents or cost more than a few coins so, it just seems more fitting.

Welcome to the first SAVE-A-CENT post!

Image:deliciouslynoted.com
Image:deliciouslynoted.com

Today’s Save-A-Cent low cost art idea will give you tips and ideas to use a paint palette more effectively. I help you think of creative ways you can make and use your own paint palettes.

The Traditional Palette Traditionally paint palettes are flat surfaces a painter uses to conveniently hold dabs of paint for their painting project. The painter arranges the colors and mixes them on the same surface.

 

 

A paint palette can be made of wood, plastic or any rigid and stable surface.  It is best to use nonporous material because you will likely add water or oil base to the paints, or other mixed media additives when mixing on top of the surface.

A palette can be any size that is manageable. The most commonly type of painter’s palette known is made of a thin wood board designed to be held in the artist’s hand and rest on the artist’s arm.

My friend, Lauren Parker Lasater is a painter and this palette is symbolic of her profession. Photo credit: Lens Friends

Watercolor palettes are generally made of plastic or porcelain with small rectangular or wheel shaped built in wells and mixing areas for colors.

As a Save-a-Cent tip, I am suggesting other ways that you can make a palette for your paint. Styrofoam packaging from meats, recycled box lids, old cookie sheets, ice cube trays and paper plates make great disposable or reusable palettes.

You can line most any platter or a regular plate or old cookie sheet with foil, parchment paper or plastic wrap for protection as well. Change the shape of a paper base plate for better comfort and effective use.

Paper plates make great pallets.
Paper plates make great pallets.

Paper plates come in all sizes and weights. The more ridged a plate the better. It should withstand the brushing against it with the paint brush or palate knife.

For artists of all ages, the placement of hands for holding this type of palate is a challenge. As a creative solution to hold the plate more securely, pre-cut the plate from a round shape to a kidney shape and cut a designated area for your thumb to rest. Hold it in support of the palm of your hand under the plate. Make this for a left or right-hander comfortably and affordably.

 

Image:theleftcoastmama
Image:theleftcoastmama

Let us know if you plan to use this specific paper plate paint project for saving time and money while painting in comfort.

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Awesome Art: The Power of Art

No matter if you are artistic, have a streak of creative genius from time to time or are one that appreciates all that art offers.  Art has a powerful effect on many. Art is awesome.

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I wanted to share a few thoughts about why I believe art is awesome and why I take pride in the projects that evolve from my workspace: Club Creative Studio.

Art is Powerful

1. Art is Emotional.  Art has the power to express how you feel and change mood. Ask any artist and they will probably let you in on the secret that the act of creating art makes them happy.

2. Art is Profound. Stepping beyond beginning and including masters of a craft, art is an “experience”.  Art stems from unique circumstances and stories. Art offers a means of communication and connection.

3. Art is for Sharing. Art can be expressed for personal and public appreciation. When art is created for artist’s eyes only, it becomes a resource for growth. When art is shared with others, it can take on a “Pay it Forward” gift. Artists that share their art with others invite understanding of the creative process. Creativity is a learning process and when artists open doors to creativeness, the spark for others can also be ignited.

4. Art is Information. The reason why the spirit of art is informational is because art can be viewed as a document of experiences.  It is sometimes a learned choice to use art as a reference point for what is found around us. We can use art to deliver messages, mark history and express inner feelings.

5. Art is Healing. Art has potentials to be a personal attraction for heightening our senses and be used as physical, emotional, and spiritual developments.

For me, all of the points I write about above are calls for purpose of art for me at Club Creative Studio. Perhaps you can relate?

Art for me has always been emotional. Because I attach a connection of self to my art, it is one reason why the love of what is created is mixed right into each of my creations.

Art is a learning experience. Creativity and imagination is always a stretch for growth when I create.  It is what places purpose into a project.

It makes me happy to be able to share Art That Sets You Apart and this is the main reason why I create. I enjoy helping others overcome ordinary and define their individuality by wearing and sharing unique art.

There is much to consider when we observe or create art. If we look deep into art around us, we can learn more about our world and the persons creating and sharing their points of views. Not to mention, the times when art reflects joy and radiates with others.

A healthy appreciation for art and those sharing it is just one highlight to understanding why art makes us respond. I hope that you gain an awareness for art and the awesome contributions if offers our world.

I welcome you to share the reasons why you think art is awesome as well.  It is certainly a great addition to add to your agenda- being an advocate for art.

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Q-tip Art Celebrate the letter Q

Art can be found in many places. I have stressed this in many Club Creative Studio blog posts before.  Today is no different as we celebrate the letter “Q”, I have a focus on Q-tips as an art supply.

Recently while walking down the hallway of my daughter’s dorm, I noticed a piece of art on one of the doors. It was apparently created by a young child as the signature indicated crude penmanship.  Come to think of it…given the fact that I was at a university, I would certainly HOPE that the art was created from someone much younger being it’s elementary style.

Q tip art sampleThis art was created by dipping the ends of Q-tips into various paint colors.  This theme was apparently autumn, however, I can see the use of different colors used to highlight other seasons, painting dots to represent for example flowers or buds.

The style of Pointillism which is a technique that places small, distinct dots of pure color usually paint are applied in patterns to form an image. Georges Seurat and Paul Signac developed the technique in 1886, branching from Impressionism but, this effect can be accomplished in a wide variety of mediums including markers.  It can be replicated easily by painting on the ends of Q-tips.

I recall creating a Pointillism project in art class in the 6th grade where we used Q-tips for this technique. Each dot represented a section of an object and when we stood back to appreciate each dot, our eyes focused on blending the colors naturally. The technique relies on the ability of the eye and mind of the viewer to blend the color spots into a fuller range of tones, thus completing the picture from dots to larger images. The same goes for this tree sample when you squint your eyes, individual dots become a whole area.

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I found a blog that highlighted an interesting project that also used Q-tips.  This project was inspired by nature.  It is also a sculptural work of art.  This simple yet creative piece was completed by an elementary student in an art class as posted by a teacher at: Splish Splash Splatter.  I can see an adult using these for table setting decorations, a festive wreath, hanging in a window pane area or even just displayed on a large platter, as well as in a pot as a potted plant, or created in several different sizes placed in a container like a topiary display, just to suggest a few.

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Image:splishsplashsplatter.blogspot

What so you say, are you going to look at the use of Q-tips more creatively from now on? These are just a few of the interesting art projects you can try using Q-tips. Are you ready to help someone get started?

Be sure to check back on this blog or better yet, sign up for the easy sign-in to get notices when a new post is shared. Creativity has no limits and it is Club Creative Studio’s pleasure to share tidbits of creative information. Enjoy your future Q-tip Art projects.

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How An Elephant Paints- Celebrating the Letter H

Club Creative Studio recognizes that there is creativity in us all. Even the wild animal world can apparently display creative ways through art!

If you have ever wanted inspiration or motivation to learn to paint, view this “How-to” video of how an elephant paints as we celebrate the letter H in blogging.

If an elephant can paint- why can’t you? Chew on that question today!

Inspired? Grab some paints, your use your hands…or your trunk…in creative exploration.

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Putting It Together- Cold Connections

Club Creative Studio- Cold connection art

Club Creative Studio has been a busy place.  I have had a great time working with my mixed metal recently.  Discovering how and what I want to create by meshing layered metals in a cold connection (rivet technique) is a fun challenge. Of course, I wish to also incorporate my hand-made beads as well.

I have been working with 24-guage sheet metals. I have found that to be the most beloved thickness to design and make my jewelry with.  My studio is quite noisy when I decide to texture my metal pieces because I am hammering and pounding.  I have a new textured hammer that is double-sided and has interchangeable ends for making interesting designs.  And I also use my chasing hammer as a multi-purpose hammer for smoothing and doming, shaping and riveting. The ball-peen hammer is my main punching tool and I love the surface texture I can pound using this type hammer.

Recently to incorporate my hand-rolled clay beads, I create a pendant using mixed metals and a cold connection, then add Club Creative Studio one-of-a-kind beads to the art.  What a great combination.  To see more, be sure to check on the Facebook page and online. I will be adding sneak peek photographs and items available for in those particular venues.

http://www.facebook.com/clubcreativestudio

http://www.clubcreativestudio.com

I will be taking photos of my metal working tools at some point and use them as a blog topic. Would that be of interest to you? Let me know what other tools of my trade you would like to learn more about.  Be creative every day!

 

 

 

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Michelangelo- A Constant Learner

Image credit: abcgallery.com
Image credit: abcgallery.com

Club Creative Studio- Creativity QuoteLearning is continual and constant and creative learning is an individual  journey.  What can we learn from the above quote from the great Michelangelo?  Whether you are an emerging leader or artist. If you are a seasoned veteran at your craft, there’s always more to learn and new ways to grow within that field . At 87 years old, Michelangelo said it well: Ancora imparo (“I’m still learning).

Club Creative Studio appreciates the learning curve and supports curious minds in pursuit of creative knowledge.  Like Michelangelo,  the continual association with learning can be a passion and a reality to get the know=how to become better at something. Learning opens doors to growth and opportunity.  What do you think that Michelangelo at age 87 meant when he said “I am still learning.”  Do you think that he meant to express that he did not know it all? Did he perhaps imply that there is so much to learn about so many topics in the span of a lifetime?

Thinking about this quote today, what do you think this quote would mean to you if you were near the age of 87 versus now at the age you are now? 

This quote is great for many reasons if you ask me. It gives me a sense of wonder that the love of learning is a gift at any age, as well as a part of our life at any stage.  We simply can’t know or experience everything in our life-time.  We are in a constant revolution of thoughts and learning episodes.  We learn from our own life and from each other’s journey. We face trial and error daily and we are on a vicious cycle to catch up with the new as we hold onto and learn from the past.

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni, known commonly as Michelangelo, was an Italian Renaissance Artist: sculptor, painter, architect, poet, and engineer who exerted unparalleled influences on the development of Western art.

This quote comes to mind for me whenever I attempt a new skill and I have much to learn.  Although we look at the list of talents Michelangelo shared with us, he had to have known that with each of his creative jumps, came a humbling thought that it was all  a learning process. 

My life and creative offerings take on a personal spin from what others have done on as well.  Each creative process brings me to the realization that I can be comfortable with my level of expertise but, I can also take notice that with each topic at hand, I have opportunities to learn even more.  Taking time as an example, to attend more art classes, workshops, seminars, teleseminars and hands-on lessons, I have gained a newfound love for learning once again.  I can take time to slow down for instruction from others.  I don’t have to learn it all by myself.  In this same light as Michelangelo, I can say today that I too am still learning. Still learning new techniques, skills, people, traits, still learning about history, present day events, creative expressions, and still learning the best way to learn.

As your learning adventure marches on, what can you share about the level of excitement of continual learning?  Share your comments below, we’d love to hear about your challenges, and success stories about learning something new that helped you grow creatively.

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Let There Be Light

Inspired by Lights
Inspired by Lights

Let there be light…and light fixtures.  Club Creative Studio dedicated a few more intense glances towards beautiful light fixtures recently at The Union League in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Glowing and glamorous,  these fixtures showed traces of their utter radiance and historical pasts.  They are displayed with care with historical reference fitting the building’s  era.

Is there a wonder why I find these to be so interesting? No matter if it was a glowing glass globe, a candle stick style or a massive crystal chandelier, all are beautiful while they are lit as well as unlit.  I see more than a glow when I look upward to the ceilings, I notice form, shape and texture. The workmanship, and design elements make these creations hanging works of art. And when I stand directly under a light fixture, well the perspective is breathtaking as well.

The next time you flip a switch at home or in a more public place. Take time to look up.  What do you see? Let there be light, a light fixture that you can appreciate for its aesthetic or historical value. Let there be a light for you to appreciate and admire.

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Enjoy Bead Soup

Club Creative Studio Bead Soup Challenge photo

 

Club Creative Studio Bead Soup Challenge photo

It’s winter where Club Creative Studio is located and  it’s cold.  It’s time to enjoy a little taste of bead soup.  No, I have not decided to actually EAT, sleep and breathe beads no matter what others think that I already do.  I am taking part in a beading challenge called Bead Soup founded by artist Lori Anderson.  This bead soup challenge pairs up persons creating hand-made beads and places them in a challenge together where they put together a goodie package and mail them to each other, challenging them to create from the stash. 

This challenge has three separate reveal dates so that bead artists have time to complete their projects. Most like me, plan to document the journey.  This is the first time that I am taking part in this event.  I first got word that my “Bead Buddy” Susan was from New Hampshire a few days ago. We have a means to communicate and keep in contact throughout this project.  

The full content of our packages are supposed to be a secret until they are received by mail. We are allowed however to give sneak peeks or “teaser photos”. These are two photos that introduce with curiosity concerning what I have included for this challenge.  When I asked Susan for a hint of what she was going to send me in her package, she said with a bit of wit and humor that my beads all had holes…included something old, something new, something purchased, something hand-made, and something blue. Hummm…I can hardly wait!

My reason for taking part in this beading challenge is to experience a creative challenge and go through my steps of creative thinking with beads sent to me.  I am also in total support of the artist paired with me as I am of all of the artists also taking part in this creative process (which totals over 500 participants).  They all eagerly use their creativity and talent to make hand-made beads and share with others for artistic growth.

Please stop by this blog often as I continue to share photos and information about how my first Bead Soup challenge is going. I am ready and willing to enjoy my Bead Soup and share it with you.

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