Creative Leap

Take time on this extra day (leap day) to tap into your brilliant creativity. It is there just appreciate it…celebrate the sense of wonder…acknowledge that your creativity is at hand.

Tap into your ideas and inspirations and give your thoughts a second thought.   Yes, take time to think about what you are thinking.  Where will you leap with your creativity?  Change the way you think so that your mind works to your advantage.  Take steps to avoid the mental road blocks and worries that block productive positive thoughts and notions.

Many distractions can get in our way of our passions or our gut “feelings” in creativity. Take leaps to overcome what you are afraid of…change and the unknown. Experiment with creativity!  It is my personal mantra to Be Creative Every Day, for me it is possible and it is a daily attainable goal.  If you need a slight push for inspiration, look for what sparks you.

For some, it might not take a particular skill or talent to be creative.  It may be an action or a new way of thinking.  Enjoy a slice of creative thinking and try not to eat too much paste.

Innovation at Hewlett-Packard

HP’s philosophy for fostering an environment for creativity and innovation:
Rules of the garage:
Believe you can change the world.

Work quickly, keep the tools unlocked, work whenever.

Know when to work alone and when to work together.

Share – tools, ideas.

Trust your colleagues.

No politics.

No bureaucracy. (These are ridiculous in a garage.)

The customer defines a job well done.

Radical ideas are not bad ideas.

Invent different ways of working.

Make a contribution every day.

If it doesn’t contribute, it doesn’t leave the garage.

Believe that together we can do anything.

Invent.

-1999 HP Annual Report

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Metal Madness

Club Creative Studio’s blog brings you creative information about creativity.  Today is no exception. Usually, a Tuesday post has an underlining theme of low-cost creativity.  If you count asking a friend for use of their tools instead of buying them myself then it is considered “low-cost” (for me) anyway. Today, I have a madness for medal. I have hit the mark on the subtitle once again: Two-Cent Tuesday, low-cost creativity in a sense.  Sometimes it is wise to borrow tools that you do not have, in order to try out something that they have an expertise of.  And, if you rent tools you can experiment before you invest in supplies that you may have questions about or will not use after all.

Stephen Zawistowski, Stephen Z Metal Designs, Inc. and myself.

My artist friend, Steven Zawistowski, owner and metal artist of Steven Z Metal Designs, Inc. (http://www.stephenzmetaldesigns.com) located in North Carolina prompted me in creativity and also lent his expert advice.  He turns cool into awesome on a daily basis in his workspace by creating art from metals.  He recently offered scraps (which are actually valuable crumbs to me) of metal from his various projects,  for my experimental use.  Once I had the scraps of brass, copper and steel metals in my hand I quickly wondered what I could possibly do with them.  I could see and imagine in my mind’s eye an array of possibilities.  It was like giving a child free reign of a candy store.  My eyes could not have been any wider. What can I do? What will I do? How soon can I attempt anything?

The first idea that came to my mind was the incorporation of small samples cut and inlayed in resin at various depths, attempting to stop the normal discoloration of the metal from air over the course of time, and preserving the colors that I noticed of the metal on that particular day.  I was guessing that would be “cool enough”. Then the next obvious question came to mind.  How do I cut this metal? I was hoping that a jeweler’s saw would be adequate.  I knew that using that tool would take time and would not be as accurate as I was thinking for the forms I had imagined. I had thought of small bits of interesting curves and a variety of shards incorporated in a small area.

I asked Steve what he thought would be the best method for cutting based on what I wanted to possibly do with his scraps. He mentioned the PLASMA CUTTER. The plasma cutter is a small machine with big results. To me, hearing the name I first thought it to be dangerous. I mean really, it sounded like blood (plasma) was going to be a sacrificed in using this tool.  The name did scare me.  But, I forgot for a moment that I was dealing with a professional. Steve invited me to stop by his metal shop to check it out for myself.

Plasma Cutter: model Spectrum 625 Xtreme lr

This model is not what Steven Z had in his shop. This model is more compact but, the cutter is still the same in style and for the same use. His air compressor was quite loud, and  much larger but, the trigger hand-torch was the same as this pictured model version.  As you can see in this photo, the flame shoots out from the gun-like handle and it melts the metal like butter!

Plasma cutter in use.

Needless to say, any reservations I had about sparks or flame quickly vanished after Steve showed me  how to start.  I was like turning cool into awesome alright! So my cutting began!

Plasma cutter trigger ready to cut the scrap bronze metal.
My forms using the plasma cutter from copper sheeting.

The color changes in the metals due to the heat applied from the plasma cutter torch were amazing to see right before your eyes. Here, notice the smooth shapes, the contours of the positive shapes and the interesting left-over negative shapes. I kept an array of both shapes from the finished collected scraps. All of my cuts were free-form cuts.

The first of a few plasma cut metal shapes.
My box of hand-cut metal treasures!
Turning cool into awesome! My cut metal shapes.

We have all heard that practice makes perfect.  Well, using the plasma cutter for the first time was a thrill and I have the bug to practice more but, Steve works with metal on a daily basis as a living…I’d say he is very well-practiced!  His friend Arron had also been taken under his wing the day I visited and here they are at work or I should say…at play!

Aaron Humphrey, Steve’s friend was welding, forging and having fun with his creation in the works- a metal gothic-like rose in metal.

A. Humphrey's iron rose creation. Work-in-progress.

To find out more about what I plan to do with my cut metal, visit the Club Creative Studio business page on Facebook, check back on this blog for a post and check out the website!

Work-in- progress: One of my many ideas for incorporating the cut metal into pendants for jewelry.

http://www.clubcreativestudio.com

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Art That Sets You Apart

Club Creative Studio creates Art That Sets You Apart!

Enjoy viewing the creations in this video while listening to the musical talents of my friend, Vaughan Branch.

At the end, I share a few tidbits of information with you.
Be sure to visit the online store often, as the inventory is always one-of-a-kind, changing often.

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bEEuxn7DXb0&w=640&h=480]

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Creative Charms

Club Creative Studio Resin Charms

My creative friends that I refer to as members of the CRAFTease Crew have gathered once again to create a collaborative item with creative charms.  You may recall the blog that highlighted this group effort of creating individual charms and exchanging them with others for a charm bracelet. The December theme was The Twelve Days of Christmas.

After that pleasing experience and fun results, we decided to gather again and make and exchange more creative charms. This time we all decided to work with resin and the theme was going celebrate  Saint Valentine’s Day.  Once again we gathered for the exchange of our charms and we ended up with another memorable item.  I love the charms we created.

NC CRAFTease Crew 2012
Mixed resin poured into mini square molds.
Small items are arranged into the mold and resin is added to cover items and cure for twelve hours.
We make a mess but, it is all for the love of creativity. There is a reason.
Our great collection of completed charms! Ready to exchange!

When creativity flourishes, we get the excitement and confidence to continue on with a technique, or try something new. The NC CRAFTease Crew will be meeting again soon and I will be sharing an artful technique at our next gathering. I look forward to showing my craft-loving friends how I create in a fun medium.  Who knows what will come next? What is important is the expression of art and learning new techniques from someone who has knowledge to share.

Finished necklace with completed charms.
We have combined the charms in bracelets and necklaces.
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Survival Kit For Life

Club Creative Studio encourages and supports creativity. To help you express creativity for everyday life events, you are welcome to try this activity, the creation of a Survival Kit. Gifts known as “survival kits” house a collection of small commonly known, everyday items.  Each item is individually assigned a special symbolic meaning.  Each item combine to be so important, one has the impression that it just can’t be lived with out.  It is needed for mere survival.  That is a joke of course but, it is a nice gift with thoughtful meanings.

Club Creative Studio: Survival Kit Gift Bag (Back Side)

The list of items included in a survival kit bag can be personalized for one person or made in bulk to share with many.  Often times the items are placed in a clear bag so that the contents can be readily seen, and an itemized list is included to explain the contents. Creativity can be expressed in the packaging as items can be placed in decorative bags, boxes. baskets or buckets.

Club Creative Studio: Marriage Survival Kit Gift Bag (Front Label)

 

 

The above image is a photo of a “Marriage Survival Kit” that I made for a special occasion where many married couples gathered for an evening.  Below you will find a list to help you get started with clever sayings to accompany your items, for any type and any themed “Survival Kit”

Make sure the items are age-appropriate and safe to include in your gift giving.

TOOTHPICK: To pick out the good qualities in people.

PAPER CLIP: Help you “hold it together” during difficult times.

HERSHEY KISS: Help you remember the power of hugs and kisses.

BUTTON: To help remember the times one should button their lip.

BAND-AID: To help with life’s hurt feelings.

ERASER: Erase away any mistakes you make that you want to forget.

CANDLE: To light your way when things are their darkest.

MARBLE: For the times you feel you’ve lost all of yours.

LIFESAVER: For the times others will need your help and you will need theirs.

MINT: To remember that your friend is “worth a mint”.

GUM: Because we stick together.

STAR STICKER: You are a shining star.

HAPPY FACE STICKER: Remember to smile 😀

STICKY TAPE: To tape your lips when you have nothing good to say.

A ROCK: We are as sold as a rock!

TEA BAG: For the times that you get into hot water.

JOLLY RANCHER CANDY: To add happiness to hard times.

PENCIL: To stay sharp.

ONE PENNY: A penny for your thoughts.

Can you think of any other clever items that can be included in a theme “survival kit”?  The themes are only limited to your imagination. Make a “survival kit” with a theme for your mail delivery person, your neighbor, teachers,  a baby-sitter or the pet-sitter. Give a gift bag to members of a committee, for holiday or birthday favors. Have fun!

 

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Neat Sweet Treats

Club Creative Studio is always on the hunt for creativity. February is a sweet month to include creativity that has a focus on candy.  I am sharing a few neat ideas that are treats as well. I found a few completed examples of items that I have  created myself in the past.  They are simple enough, a child can do this alone or with minimal assistance.  I hope that you are inspired to create from these ideas, putting your own spin on the projects to make them even better with your own style.

Happy Saint Valentine’s Day as you may be helping a young child share treats with family members, classmates or neighbors. This year, make them personal, create them yourself.

Image: artistshelpingchildren.org

With a simple paper motif cut-out a flower is made.  Add your stick candy to the center portion through a hole punched section as a focal point. Your sweet treat has become a stem as well.

Image: stampinup.net

Layer cut-out flower motif shapes and you have a three-dimensional petals, the lolly pop can be used to secure the paper and grouped to create a full bouquet or single flower treat.

Image:squiddo.com

While you are discovering crafts made from candy, here is one more idea you can attach to a hand made Valentine card.  I am sure that someone will appreciate the ingenuity.

Have fun creating art your own neat sweets. It is a way to make it a special treat.

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